Roman and Greek Art

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BLOG THEME: Pics of sculptures, frescoes, mosaics, and other works of art from the ancient Rome and Greece. Also occasional artworks from other cultures if I find them interesting. There will also be links to ancient books/texts, databases and news relating to ancient Rome/Greece. Some of the pics are taken by me but there will be also a lots of reblogging.

NEW:
20/03/13 - A tag page added
20/03/13 - Heiden National Museum of Antquities added into links page. A magnificent site.
03/04/13 - A new page "translated books" added
17/05/13 - Online database of Ancient Art added into links page

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Art G4llery
History In Pics
Gatticat
Zillion Wonders of the World

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ancientart:

Ancient post-it notes!

romkids:

How often do you reach for a Post-It note? Maybe you’re making that to do list, or figuring out your groceries. But you know, what if you lived BEFORE Post-It notes or scrap paper? What would you use then?

In Thebes, where these examples are from, and across the Roman Empire, scraps of used and broken pottery would be used to scribble quick notes. These examples are called ostraka. Most of the ostraka that our conservators and curators are studying right now contain notes on taxes and granary receipts from the second century AD.

The notes are written in Greek script. Kay Sunahara, ROM archaeologist studying these pieces, described the Greek langage at the time as, “the lingua franca of the Mediterranean”. Greek was the most frequently used written language, used to help bridge the gap between speakers of different languages, much like English today.

The majority of these pieces we’re found and acquired in the early 1900’s by none other than ROM founder Charles T. Currelly.

So how are these scrap pieces of pottery useful to archaeology today? Are grocery lists really that vaulabe? For archaeologists, ostraka provide them with a great deal of information about the people who left these notes in the first place. Information such as what people were eating, trading for, in trouble for, and the prices of things, give us a unique look into those who lived far before us, in this case well over a thousand years ago.

Interestingly enough, it also shows us just how similar we are to those who lived long before. Everyone needs groceries, and a reminder letter, maybe from their mom, or from their husband, of what to get from the store.

National Archaeology Day takes place on October 20th at the ROM and many other museums around the world!

(via sam-rollings)

— 6 hours ago with 925 notes
#ancient world  #everyday life  #notes  #archaeology  #archaeological news  #Roman  #pottery 
femalenudityinwesternpainting:

"Neptune And Amphitrite" (Mosaic in a Roman house in Herculaneum, Italy) by
Anonymus (1st century), Roman Empire

femalenudityinwesternpainting:

"Neptune And Amphitrite" (Mosaic in a Roman house in Herculaneum, Italy) by

Anonymus (1st century), Roman Empire

— 8 hours ago with 71 notes
#ancient  #art  #mosaics  #Roman  #Herculaneum 
ancientart:

A quick look at: Germanicus, a prominent Roman general of the early Empire, and the grandson-in-law of Augustus Caesar.
"Germanicus, too, that he might be the better known, took his helmet off his head and begged his men to follow up the slaughter, as they wanted not prisoners, and the utter destruction of the nation would be the only conclusion of the war. And now, late in the day, he withdrew one of his legions from the field, to intrench a camp, while the rest till nightfall glutted themselves with the enemy’s blood. Our cavalry fought with indecisive success." -Tacitus, Annals (2.26), via The Internet Classics Archive.
Germanicus Julius Caesar (15 BC-AD 19), usually just referred to as Germanicus, was a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty and the nephew and adopted son of Tiberius. He commanded 8 Roman legions on the Rhine frontier with distinction. He appears to have gained affection among the Roman people; Suetonius in Life of Caligula III describes his “…unexampled kindliness, and a remarkable desire and capacity for winning men’s regard and inspiring their affection." He died aged 33 on October 9 of AD 19, it was a suspected poisoning. 
Great honours were granted to Germanicus after his death and he was elevated to a god-like status:

[…] Five voting centuries were to be named after him; a curule chair was to be kept in the temple of the new god, the temples were to be closed on the day that Germanicus’ ashes were interred and sacrifices were to be made on that day each year at his tomb.
[…] In public, all due honours were granted to Germanicus. The only oddity was that Tiberius and his mother did not attend the internment. Some bad feeling may have been read into this by Germanicus’ supporters, but this would seem to be an over-reaction.
-Richard Alston in Aspects of Roman History AD 14–117, page 28.

Sculpture courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Jastrow. The sculpture dates to circa 40 AD, Accession number: Ma 1238.

ancientart:

A quick look at: Germanicus, a prominent Roman general of the early Empire, and the grandson-in-law of Augustus Caesar.

"Germanicus, too, that he might be the better known, took his helmet off his head and begged his men to follow up the slaughter, as they wanted not prisoners, and the utter destruction of the nation would be the only conclusion of the war. And now, late in the day, he withdrew one of his legions from the field, to intrench a camp, while the rest till nightfall glutted themselves with the enemy’s blood. Our cavalry fought with indecisive success." -Tacitus, Annals (2.26), via The Internet Classics Archive.

Germanicus Julius Caesar (15 BC-AD 19), usually just referred to as Germanicus, was a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty and the nephew and adopted son of Tiberius. He commanded 8 Roman legions on the Rhine frontier with distinction. He appears to have gained affection among the Roman people; Suetonius in Life of Caligula III describes his “…unexampled kindliness, and a remarkable desire and capacity for winning men’s regard and inspiring their affection." He died aged 33 on October 9 of AD 19, it was a suspected poisoning.

Great honours were granted to Germanicus after his death and he was elevated to a god-like status:

[…] Five voting centuries were to be named after him; a curule chair was to be kept in the temple of the new god, the temples were to be closed on the day that Germanicus’ ashes were interred and sacrifices were to be made on that day each year at his tomb.

[…] In public, all due honours were granted to Germanicus. The only oddity was that Tiberius and his mother did not attend the internment. Some bad feeling may have been read into this by Germanicus’ supporters, but this would seem to be an over-reaction.

-Richard Alston in Aspects of Roman History AD 14–117, page 28.

Sculpture courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Jastrow. The sculpture dates to circa 40 AD, Accession number: Ma 1238.

(via originalitynotrequired)

— 11 hours ago with 428 notes
#Germanicus  #julio-claudian dynasty  #ancient  #art  #Roman  #sculpture  #statue  #marble 

femalenudityinwesternpainting:

"Mars And Venus", "Satyr And Maenad (1)", "Perseus And Andromeda (1)", "Perseus And Andromeda (2)", "Satyr And Maenad (2)" (These Murals were all from Pompeii, Italy, now in the Naples National Archaeological Museum) by

Anonymus (1st century), Roman Empire

— 1 day ago with 42 notes
#ancient  #art  #Pompeii  #fresco  #Roman 
whitehotel:

Unknown Roman, Fresco found near Pompeii (A.D. 14–62)

whitehotel:

Unknown Roman, Fresco found near Pompeii (A.D. 14–62)

(via auqm)

— 1 day ago with 196 notes
#ancient  #art  #Roman  #fresco  #Pompeii  #animals 
uncuartopropio:

  Sarcófago de Cerveteri, obra etrusca, siglo VI a.C
  (elegida por Amalia Bautista)

uncuartopropio:

  Sarcófago de Cerveteri, obra etrusca, siglo VI a.C

  (elegida por Amalia Bautista)

— 1 day ago with 47 notes

hellenic-macedonia:

The Derveni krater is a volute krater the most elaborate of its type,[2] discovered in 1962 in a tomb at Derveni, not far from Thessaloniki, and displayed at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki. Weighing 40 kg, it is made of an alloy of bronze and tin in skilfully chosen amounts, which endows it with a superb golden sheen without use of any gold at all.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derveni_krater

Ως κάτοχος του αγγείου αναφέρεται σε επιγραφή στο χείλος ο Αστιούνειος Αναξαγοραίοι ες Λάρισας, δηλαδή ο Αστιούνειος, γιος του Αναξαγόρα, από την Λάρισα. Η θεσσαλική καταγωγή του κατόχου συνδέεται με την ομηρεία της αριστοκρατικής οικογένειας των Αλευάδων από το Φίλιππο Β’ (334 π.Χ.) μετά την αποτυχημένη τους απόπειρα να αποτινάξουν τη μακεδονική κυριαρχία.

Υ.Γ. Αξίζει να σημειώσουμε την ευγένεια και τον επαγγελματισμό των εργαζομένων στο Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείο της Θεσσαλονίκης. Ευχαριστούμε!

(via maxvis68)

— 1 day ago with 77 notes
#ancient  #art  #krater  #Greece  #Greek  #bronze 
fromgr:

Niki tis Samothrakis
The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called the Nike of Samothrace,[2] is a 2nd-century BC marble sculpture of the Greekgoddess Nike (Victory). Since 1884, it has been prominently displayed at the Louvre and is one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world. H.W. Janson described it as “the greatest masterpiece of Hellenistic sculpture.”[1]
Image / Winged Victory os Samothrace ,Musee du Louvre (Paris,France)

fromgr:

Niki tis Samothrakis

The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called the Nike of Samothrace,[2] is a 2nd-century BC marble sculpture of the Greekgoddess Nike (Victory). Since 1884, it has been prominently displayed at the Louvre and is one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world. H.W. Janson described it as “the greatest masterpiece of Hellenistic sculpture.”[1]

Image / Winged Victory os Samothrace ,Musee du Louvre (Paris,France)

— 1 day ago with 25 notes
#ancient  #art  #statue  #sculpture  #marble  #nike of samonthrace  #Greek  #Greece 
clioancientart:

 Roman Olive Green Mold-Blown Glass Sprinkler Flask 
Link: http://www.clioancientart.com/catalog/i394.html
CULTURE / REGION OF ORIGIN: Roman Empire, probably Syria / Palestine.
DATE: 3rd or early 4th Century CE
DIMENSIONS: 8.5 cm tall (3.4 in.), 4.73 cm wide at the rim (1.75 in.), 5.0 cm wide in the body (2.0 in.)
DESCRIPTION: Intact. A Roman mold-blown sprinkler flask of transparent light olive green glass. There is a cylindrical internal diaphragm at the base of the cylindrical neck formed by a cut-out with a small central aperture. The body was  blown into a two-part mold, creating a surface pattern of diamonds in relief. A wide splayed rim, folded over forms the thick, beveled edge. The bottom is flattened. There is a pontil mark at the bottom, and minimal encrustation on the interior.
PROVENANCE: Formerly in a German private collection until 2002. California private collection until 2012.
COMPARISONS:  E. Marianne Stern, Roman, Byzantine, and Early Medieval Glass, 10 BCE - 700 CE, Ernesto Wolf Collection, Osfildern-Ruit, 2001,Catalogue Numbers 130, 131 and 132 for very similar examples in transparent grayish-green, transparent pale green and transparent colorless glass, respectively.

clioancientart:

Roman Olive Green Mold-Blown Glass Sprinkler Flask

Link: http://www.clioancientart.com/catalog/i394.html

CULTURE / REGION OF ORIGIN: Roman Empire, probably Syria / Palestine.

DATE: 3rd or early 4th Century CE

DIMENSIONS: 8.5 cm tall (3.4 in.), 4.73 cm wide at the rim (1.75 in.), 5.0 cm wide in the body (2.0 in.)

DESCRIPTION: Intact. A Roman mold-blown sprinkler flask of transparent light olive green glass. There is a cylindrical internal diaphragm at the base of the cylindrical neck formed by a cut-out with a small central aperture. The body was  blown into a two-part mold, creating a surface pattern of diamonds in relief. A wide splayed rim, folded over forms the thick, beveled edge. The bottom is flattened. There is a pontil mark at the bottom, and minimal encrustation on the interior.

PROVENANCE: Formerly in a German private collection until 2002. California private collection until 2012.

COMPARISONS:  E. Marianne Stern, Roman, Byzantine, and Early Medieval Glass, 10 BCE - 700 CE, Ernesto Wolf Collection, Osfildern-Ruit, 2001,Catalogue Numbers 130, 131 and 132 for very similar examples in transparent grayish-green, transparent pale green and transparent colorless glass, respectively.

— 2 days ago with 25 notes
#ancient art  #Roman  #glassware 
hellenismo:

Ἕκτη Μεσοῦντος/ Ἕκτη ἐπὶ δέκα /Ἑκκαιδεκάτη, XVI dayFrom today’s sunset: sixteenth day of Mounychion. Festival of Artemis Mounychia, “Lady of the golden sword”, “Protectress of the harbor”: “The sixteenth of Munichion they dedicated to Artemis, for on that day the Goddess shone with full moon upon the Greeks as they were conquering at Salamis.” (Plut. De Gloria Athen. 7)"The amphiphôntes (cakes) are made in the month of Mounychion on the sixteenth, and they are brought into the temple of Artemis Mounychia. As to why their name is amphiphôntes, some [say that it is] because they are made at the time when the Sun and the Moon appear early over the earth; but Apollodorus [says that it is] because they fasten bundles of firewood to them when bringing them.” "The amphiphon was a kind of cheesecake consecrated to Artemis, having figures of lighted torches round it. Philemon, in his Beggar, or Woman of Rhodes, says-Artemis, mistress dear, I bring you nowThis amphiphon, and what is needed for holy libation.Diphilus also mentions it in his Hecate. Philochorus also mentions the fact of its being called amphiphon, and of its being brought into the temples of Artemis, and also to the crossroads, on the day when the moon is overtaken at its setting by the rising of the sun; and so the sky is doubly light (ἀμφίφως).” (Suidas, s. v. Ἀνάστατοι; Athen. 14. 645)"O Lady of Mounychia, Watcher of Harbours, hail, Lady of Pherae! Let none disparage Artemis. For Oeneus dishonoured Her altar and no pleasant struggles came upon his city. Nor let any content with Her in shooting of stags or in archery. For the son of Atreus vaunted him not that he suffered small requital. Neither let any woo the Maiden; for not Otus, nor Orion wooed Her to their own good. Nor let any shun the yearly dance; for not tearless to Hippo was her refusal to dance around the altar. Hail, great queen, and graciously greet my song."Callimachus Hymn to Artemis, 258(Votive offerings to Artemis Mounychia, from the Sanctuary of Artemis Mounychia. Archaeological Museum of Piraeus.)

hellenismo:

Ἕκτη Μεσοῦντος/ Ἕκτη ἐπὶ δέκα /Ἑκκαιδεκάτη, XVI day

From today’s sunset: sixteenth day of Mounychion. Festival of Artemis Mounychia, “Lady of the golden sword”, “Protectress of the harbor”: “The sixteenth of Munichion they dedicated to Artemis, for on that day the Goddess shone with full moon upon the Greeks as they were conquering at Salamis.” (Plut. De Gloria Athen. 7)

"The amphiphôntes (cakes) are made in the month of Mounychion on the sixteenth, and they are brought into the temple of Artemis Mounychia. As to why their name is amphiphôntes, some [say that it is] because they are made at the time when the Sun and the Moon appear early over the earth; but Apollodorus [says that it is] because they fasten bundles of firewood to them when bringing them.” 

"The amphiphon was a kind of cheesecake consecrated to Artemis, having figures of lighted torches round it. Philemon, in his Beggar, or Woman of Rhodes, says-
Artemis, mistress dear, I bring you now
This amphiphon, and what is needed for holy libation.

Diphilus also mentions it in his Hecate. Philochorus also mentions the fact of its being called amphiphon, and of its being brought into the temples of Artemis, and also to the crossroads, on the day when the moon is overtaken at its setting by the rising of the sun; and so the sky is doubly light (ἀμφίφως).” 
(Suidas, s. v. Ἀνάστατοι; Athen. 14. 645)

"O Lady of Mounychia, Watcher of Harbours, hail, Lady of Pherae! Let none disparage Artemis. For Oeneus dishonoured Her altar and no pleasant struggles came upon his city. Nor let any content with Her in shooting of stags or in archery. For the son of Atreus vaunted him not that he suffered small requital. Neither let any woo the Maiden; for not Otus, nor Orion wooed Her to their own good. Nor let any shun the yearly dance; for not tearless to Hippo was her refusal to dance around the altar. Hail, great queen, and graciously greet my song."
Callimachus Hymn to Artemis, 258

(Votive offerings to Artemis Mounychia, from the Sanctuary of Artemis Mounychia. Archaeological Museum of Piraeus.)

— 2 days ago with 18 notes